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Picture yourself at the top of your game
For:
Burnout ,
Worry ,
Workplace issues & unemployment ,
Sadness
Be like Mike. He credits tapping in to the power of his mind—visualizing himself winning—to helping him become a master of basketball. And it’s is something you can try too. What’s the equivalent to making a basket, or winning a championship trophy in your life? If you picture yourself achieving this in your mind, your brain actually does the work to create a new neural pathway. In non-science speak, this means when you visualize something vividly, and repeatedly, the brain feels like you’ve actually done the thing you’ve imagined. So when the situation arises in real life, you can be calm in the moment and worry a little less about how to do the thing because you’ve already experienced it your mind.
Lightbulb Activity
Get introspective
For:
Anger ,
Burnout ,
Sadness
Sometimes a little self reflection can go a long way. If you need ideas for where to start, pay attention to how every part of your body feels, starting from your head down to your toes. Then try asking yourself: What am I feeling right now? Why am I feeling that way?
Lightbulb Activity
Get creative
For:
Burnout ,
Chronic health issues & disabilities ,
Sadness ,
Loneliness ,
Worry
Creative expression can be one of the healthiest ways to cope with trauma. Whether it be painting, writing, comedy, dancing, singing, cooking—doing something you find joy in can uplift the mind, soul, and spirit. If you have a hobby from the past you’ve been meaning to pick back up, carve some time out to give it a go. If you're hesitant, adult coloring books are an easy (and surprisingly zen) place to start.
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Manage your close relationships and communication
For:
Family conflict ,
Grief & loss ,
Opening up to friends & family ,
Relationship issues & breakups ,
Sadness ,
Worry
When you're going through a challenging situation, it may also stressful for your family and other close relationships. So keep the lines of communication open, and ask for the support you need. At the same time, encourage your loved ones who are helping out to take time for themselves when their help extends over a longer period of time—it can be easy to burn out, and you’ll want to know they get the relief they need. There may be a range of support options available through your employer, a therapist, state or federal government, or community groups that can help lighten the load and extend your support system.
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Stay current on healthcare and be open with your doctors
For:
Non-substance addiction ,
Substance use ,
Trauma
See your doctor(s) for regular check-ups. Doing this can catch conditions before they become bigger issues. Make a habit of sharing your questions and concerns so you know what you’re dealing with, and can get the help you need. If relevant, consider what long term and end-of-life care options are important to you, and tell a trusted loved one. Though it may be difficult to think about, it’ll provide relief to know you’ve communicated your wishes in advance of any emergency situations and will prevent them from being put in difficult positions later.
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Stay connected
Spending time with people you trust can really help you process and manage big emotions and is good for your mental health overall. Even if you don’t feel up to it, reach out to friends and family you trust, in person or remotely. You might be surprised how much it helps in hard moments.
Lightbulb Self-Care
Prioritize self-care and stress relief
Set aside a dedicated time each day to do something that makes you feel calm, alleviates stress or simply makes you happy—whether it’s meditation, giving yourself a facial, cooking, dancing to your favorite playlist, walking your dog, or doodling in a coloring book.
Lightbulb Self-Care
Don’t forget your basic needs
When you’re in a crisis or managing big emotions, it’s easy to forget the everyday habits that can improve your mood and well-being. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep, eight to 10 hours is ideal. Spend time outside when possible. Move your body in whatever way you can that feels good to you. Make sure you’re eating and drinking plenty of water. Try journaling, meditation, or breathing to help you ground yourself in the present moment.

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